Sunday, November 15, 2015

The Internet Is Broken — Should We Fix It?

There is too much data moving across the ether toady.  So much that it is overloading the entire system.  Bottle necking.  You’ve seen it.  You know you have.  Things are loading slower.  You know it’s true but you do not want to admit it.  Else all your pet sites could be out of your reach.  Ahhhh!

Working with an ISP we have clients that will tell us that something is wrong with “our” Internet because they cannot load some file, "It's been stuck at 15% for an hour."  Meanwhile they are streaming videos or playing games online.  Logic, which I have come to the conclusion is nonexistent today, never enters their picture.  They are using megabytes of data over this ‘Internet connection’ but because they cannot get a simple 115kb file then something is wrong with their connection.  I don't even know how to respond to them anymore.  If your logic cannot sort that, what can I possibly say that can make them understand.

How did we get here?  Was it texting that took away our ability to hold real conversations with real people?  Was it reality TV that dumbed us down to believe that is reality and that we are not as dumb as those people?  (Yet we are the ones still watching them)

The Internet Isn’t Broke — We Are

No don’t fix the Internet, just walk away from it.  It has broke us.  We are paying the price everyday — mentally and physically.  The added stress and consumed hours that we spend online doing things that we do not need to do.  Things that 15 years ago were unheard of.  Are we any better of today?  Personally, computers have stolen more time and productivity from me in the last 15 years then I care to think about.  I was far more productive when there were fewer options.  

"Then why don't you go back to that" I hear you saying.  I'm working on it.  Unfortunately, like many of you, what we have employed ourselves in has demanded that we are 'connected', and thus chained to our masters that promised us more time to do what we want, more productivity, and on.  Now that they have us in their grasp we find that they lied to us.  We power them, we give them energy — not just electrically but physically and mentally.  Yet we do not turn them on, the power switch is no longer ours — they turn us on.  They are our masters now, and we bow down to them.  After all, here we are.  Both you and I, on the Internet, on some computing device.  Sacrificing the time of our lives.

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